Barbarella is known for its psychedelic visual and musical aesthetic. Released in 1968, the same year as The Beatles’ self-titled magnum opus as well as the first records from The MC5 and Can, respectively, the film frequently employed an oil wheel projector, a common visual effect from the psychedelic music scene. It also featured music from pysch-pop group The Glitterhouse. Interestingly, Frank Zappa was in negotiations to compose the film’s score, although he ultimately ceded the job to Charles Fox.

Barbarella is known for its psychedelic visual and musical aesthetic. Released in 1968, the same year as The Beatles’ self-titled magnum opus as well as the first records from The MC5 and Can, respectively, the film frequently employed an oil wheel projector, a common visual effect from the psychedelic music scene. It also featured music from pysch-pop group The Glitterhouse. Interestingly, Frank Zappa was in negotiations to compose the film’s score, although he ultimately ceded the job to Charles Fox.

Among the actresses offered the role of Barbarella were Raquel Welch, Sophia Loren and Virna Lisi. Jane Fonda, who eventually accepted the part, herself turned down the much more commercially and critically successful Bonnie and Clyde and Rosemary’s Baby to appear in the film.

Among the actresses offered the role of Barbarella were Raquel Welch, Sophia Loren and Virna Lisi. Jane Fonda, who eventually accepted the part, herself turned down the much more commercially and critically successful Bonnie and Clyde and Rosemary’s Baby to appear in the film.

Barbarella, a sci-fi film by Roger Vadim, released in 1968. An adaptation of the graphic novel by Jean-Claude Forest, Barbarella matches the silly, sexy tone of a B-grade exploitation flick with the stunning visual aesthetics of a French art film. Especially noteworthy is the beautiful cinematography by Claude Renoir and the inspired costume design by Jacques Fonteray (inspired by the work of Paco Rabanne).
"This is a much too poetic way to die."

Barbarella, a sci-fi film by Roger Vadim, released in 1968. An adaptation of the graphic novel by Jean-Claude Forest, Barbarella matches the silly, sexy tone of a B-grade exploitation flick with the stunning visual aesthetics of a French art film. Especially noteworthy is the beautiful cinematography by Claude Renoir and the inspired costume design by Jacques Fonteray (inspired by the work of Paco Rabanne).

"This is a much too poetic way to die."

No Third Path, the sequel to The Future is Ours, Comrade: Conversations with the Russians, is a non-fiction exploration of the perception of communism, written by the acclaimed novelist Jerzy Kosinski — before he had yet written any novels — under the pen name Joseph Novak. It was first printed in hardcover in 1962.

No Third Path, the sequel to The Future is Ours, Comrade: Conversations with the Russians, is a non-fiction exploration of the perception of communism, written by the acclaimed novelist Jerzy Kosinski — before he had yet written any novels — under the pen name Joseph Novak. It was first printed in hardcover in 1962.

Spartacus, a historical film directed by Stanley Kubrick, released in 1960. An epic in the truest sense of the word, Spartacus follows a slave revolt in the Roman Empire led by the title character, played by Kirk Douglas, who also executive produced.
This poster comes from the German release of the film.
"Privately, I believe in none of [the gods] - neither do you. Publicly, I believe in them all."

Spartacus, a historical film directed by Stanley Kubrick, released in 1960. An epic in the truest sense of the word, Spartacus follows a slave revolt in the Roman Empire led by the title character, played by Kirk Douglas, who also executive produced.

This poster comes from the German release of the film.

"Privately, I believe in none of [the gods] - neither do you. Publicly, I believe in them all."

Spartacus, a historical novel by Howard Fast, published in 1951. This novel was the basis for the 1960 film directed by Stanley Kubrick. It was originally self-published during the McCarthy era, as Fast was on the black list and no publishers would print it.
Interestingly, Spartacus, the film, was credited with “breaking the black list” when executive producer Kirk Douglas refused to use pseudonyms when crediting both Fast and screen-writer Donald Trumbo, who was also on the black list at the time.
This cover comes from a paperback printing in 1980.

Spartacus, a historical novel by Howard Fast, published in 1951. This novel was the basis for the 1960 film directed by Stanley Kubrick. It was originally self-published during the McCarthy era, as Fast was on the black list and no publishers would print it.

Interestingly, Spartacus, the film, was credited with “breaking the black list” when executive producer Kirk Douglas refused to use pseudonyms when crediting both Fast and screen-writer Donald Trumbo, who was also on the black list at the time.

This cover comes from a paperback printing in 1980.

The Killing, a crime film directed by Stanley Kubrick, released in 1956. A group of criminals led by Sterling Hayden attempt to pull off a complicated heist at a racetrack.
“You know, I’ve often thought that the gangster and the artist are the same in the eyes of the masses. They are admired and hero-worshipped, but there is always present an underlying wish to see them destroyed at the peak of their glory.”

The Killing, a crime film directed by Stanley Kubrick, released in 1956. A group of criminals led by Sterling Hayden attempt to pull off a complicated heist at a racetrack.

You know, I’ve often thought that the gangster and the artist are the same in the eyes of the masses. They are admired and hero-worshipped, but there is always present an underlying wish to see them destroyed at the peak of their glory.”

2 Weeks in Another Town, a showbiz movie directed by Vincente Minnelli, released in 1962. Kirk Douglas plays a down-and-out actor trying to reclaim his fame by shooting a film in Rome.
“When you’re dying, everybody is nice to you. It’s nauseating!”

2 Weeks in Another Town, a showbiz movie directed by Vincente Minnelli, released in 1962. Kirk Douglas plays a down-and-out actor trying to reclaim his fame by shooting a film in Rome.

When you’re dying, everybody is nice to you. It’s nauseating!”

Women in Cages, a crime film directed by Gerardo de León, released in 1971. The story revolves around a woman (Jennifer Gan) wrongly sent to a prison patrolled by a sadistic guard, played by Pam Grier.
It was released the same year as Big Doll House, which had a similar story, was shot in the same location and featured much of the same cast.
“This game is called survival. Let’s see how well you can play it. I was strung-out behind smack at ten and worked in the streets when I was twelve. You’ve got a long way to go.”

Women in Cages, a crime film directed by Gerardo de León, released in 1971. The story revolves around a woman (Jennifer Gan) wrongly sent to a prison patrolled by a sadistic guard, played by Pam Grier.

It was released the same year as Big Doll House, which had a similar story, was shot in the same location and featured much of the same cast.

This game is called survival. Let’s see how well you can play it. I was strung-out behind smack at ten and worked in the streets when I was twelve. You’ve got a long way to go.”

Sirens of Titan by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., published in 1959. Titan is Vonneguts’ second novel, a science-fiction story about a man who transcends space and time and, thus, sees the infinite reach of time - the past, present and future - simultaneously. 
“The worst thing that could possibly happen to anybody would be to not be used for anything by anybody. Thank you for using me …”

Sirens of Titan by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., published in 1959. Titan is Vonneguts’ second novel, a science-fiction story about a man who transcends space and time and, thus, sees the infinite reach of time - the past, present and future - simultaneously. 

The worst thing that could possibly happen to anybody would be to not be used for anything by anybody. Thank you for using me …”